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Projects - True Wildlife

Conservation Projects 

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Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary (LiWiSa) rescues, rehabilitates, and releases wildlife that has been illegally kept as pets or destined to bushmeat. 

They also provide lifelong care to wildlife that cannot be released back into the wild. 

LiWiSa works with a wide variety of wildlife like; pangolins, civets, genets, monkeys, antelope, raptors, sea turtles and crocodiles. 

Wildlife Sanctuary Relief Fund

 

In Liberia, communities and organizations depend greatly on the income generated from tourism. COVID-19 lock-downs resulted in a halt in tourism and the crucial funds that it brings in to support the economy, jobs, and conservation.
At Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary, 50% of the revenue that directly supports animal care depends on visitors.

To help bridge the gap from lost tourism revenue and other COVID-19 impacts, Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary and True Wildlife have established the Wildlife Sanctuary Relief Fund.
All donations made to this fund will go towards the care of the 98 animals at the sanctuary, help pay staff wages, and support the continued rescue efforts of confiscated wildlife. 

Sea Turtle Project

The Sea Turtle Project is a critical conservation project founded by Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary (LiWiSa). The aim is to restore sea turtle populations by protecting laying females, nests and hatchlings.

 The Libassa Beach is a popular nesting site for the Olive Ridley Sea Turtle and the Leatherback Sea Turtle. Both turtle species are considered endangered with decreasing populations. 

 

Sooty Mangabey Release Project

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary is raising funds to initiate the release of a group of confiscated Sooty Mangabeys into a protected area. This will allow more space for other confiscated monkeys and wildlife to enter the sanctuary and would act as a release guide for other primate species.

Eco guards would monitor the released monkeys for one year, and provide supplementary food to the group while they acclimate and learn where to find food.

Cost of Project:

Endangered Wildlife Operational Center

Endangered Wildlife Operational Center (EWOC) is raising funds to complete a property assessment report so that they can proceed with their work in veterinary treatment and rehabilitation of wildlife. 

EWOC provides specialized veterinary care for endangered species including, but not limited to, elephants, rhinos, and raptors. 

True Wildlife

True Wildlife makes every donation count! 100% of funds go directly to the conservation of wildlife and endangered species. 

True Wildlife depends on donations to cover our operating and administrative expenses.

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